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Attorney 2.Oh! Leverage The Web To Land Your Next Attorney Job – Part 3

September 14, 2011

The following is an excerpt from a white paper recently written for a group of 3L’s at a prominent law school.  The principles are applicable to attorneys looking for jobs at any level.  You can find Part 2 here and Part 1 here.

In Part 1 of this series, we covered reasons why digital reputation is becoming increasingly important for attorney job seekers and I advocated the AIM Model for growing a targeted online reputation.  In Part 2 of this series, we discussed “assessment” strategies under the model and today we discuss “influencing” your reputation under AIM.

Influencing Your Digital Reputation

You will never own your own digital reputation!  You can only influence it.

Read those last two sentences three more times.  They are that important.

What do I mean by “own” a reputation?  Just as with offline life, outsiders can come along and hurt (or help) your digital reputation.  A spiteful ex-girlfriend or any other random person can digitally post negative information about you (or somebody with a name like you) and it can turn up under a search for your name in the search engines.

So how do we control what we can control (aka “influence”)?  By acquiring as much digital real estate as possible where we can put up our desired (focused) message.

Each little acre of digital real estate you acquire on a different platform gives you the ability to snag one spot in the list of results that come up when somebody searches your name in the search engines (“Search Engine Results Pages” or “SERPs”).

To see an example of this, google my name “Tracy Thrower Conyers” and you’ll see my name in connection with a slew of different little digital “houses” – some that I control and many that I don’t.

What digital real estate do I recommend for lawyers Read more…

Attorney 2.Oh! Leverage The Web To Land Your Next Attorney Job – Part 2

September 13, 2011

The following is an excerpt from a white paper recently written for a group of 3L’s at a prominent law school.  The principles are applicable to attorneys looking for jobs at any level.  You can find Part 1 here.

In Part 1 of this series, we covered reasons why digital reputation is becoming increasingly important for attorney job seekers and I advocated the AIM Model for growing a targeted online reputation.  Today, we discuss “assessment” strategies under that model.

Assessing Your Digital Reputation

The first assessment step is defining your endgame.  Who is your audience and what do you want them to know?  In the case of junior attorneys looking for jobs, the audience is who you see yourself working for, whether that’s a small firm, large firm, in-house law department, non-profit entity, governmental agency or the like.

What do you want your audience to know?  You want them to know that you’re a new, ambitious, hardworking attorney with x, y and z special talents.  As you work to define your audience, what that audience is looking for (based on research, not wishful thinking), and what you offer that is attractive to your audience, you are developing your “marketing statement.”

The idea of “marketing” might be a foreign concept to junior lawyers, but trust me as a longtime attorney and legal recruiter when I tell you that Read more…

Attorney 2.Oh! Leverage The Web To Land Your Next Attorney Job – Part 1

September 12, 2011

The following is an excerpt from a white paper recently written for a group of 3L’s at a prominent law school.  The principles are applicable to attorneys looking for jobs at any level.

There is no question that Web 2.0, with its inexpensive tools and exponential reach has changed much of the way business is conducted these days.  Recruiting is no exception.

Today’s graduating law students may not even remember Web 1.0, but in early web days, web information was a one-way flow of information that website owners published, and then sat back and hoped visitors would find.

The next iteration of the web – “Web 2.0” – was much more interactive, and invited conversation and development of community.  Early sites like MySpace (known as a gathering place for entertainment-minded people) and Facebook (known as a gathering place for friends and family to have digital conversations and share photos) contributed to the social revolution.

Flash forward to today and “social media” is ubiquitous.  Recruiting is a natural context for encouraging inexpensive social conversation – hiring entities can showcase their companies and advertise their jobs.  Employee candidates can shop opportunities in great detail.

Lawyers and law firms, with their heavy emphasis on historic precedent and conservative natures, have been slower to adopt social recruiting to the same extent as their corporate cousins, but they are increasingly making their way to the social media party.

What does this mean for attorney job seekers? Read more…

Why You Can’t Afford To Ignore Google+

August 13, 2011

Reprinted from Wired Advisor

Google+ is An Important Piece of Your Online Presence

by

Google+ for financial professionalsYou may have heard some recent buzz about Google+  as it has been rolled out in beta over the last several weeks, I’ve been spending a bit of time there in addition to reading many articles about Google’s version of a social network. Its Google’s way of thinking about how people find and share content.

I do think Google+ is going to potentially redefine the way we discover, share, and consume information online. It’s going to make the process much more intelligent based on our social graph, which is who we are connected to and how we are connected to them.

Now you don’t need to abandon any of your existing social media efforts on sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, and You Tube. Networks will come and go over time, but it’s important to claim your stake in the ones that can help you be found by your target markets, connect with your target markets, and enhance your online reputation.  In addition, your community is portable to an extent…you can bring your connections with you or easily cross-promote your social profiles. What makes Google+ matter at this point is that it will help your online reputation and here’s why: Read more…

Congratulations ABA Journal Blawg 100 Winners!

January 5, 2010

Big congratulations from Plugged In Lawyer to the winners of this year’s ABA Journal Blawg poll:

Third Annual ABA Journal Blawg 100 – Magazine – ABA Journal

Way to go, blawgers!

Yes Virginia, Social Media Does Apply To Law Firms

January 1, 2010

Jay Baer wrote a great post earlier this week titled Crushing The Myth of B2B Social Media.  He opens his post by saying that hardly a speech or webinar goes by where he isn’t asked “But all this social media stuff doesn’t apply to B2B right?”  This post got me to thinking about law firms, especially the big ones.

Now I haven’t been in a position to chat with a lot of law firms about their social media strategy, but it sure seems to me that they must be thinking along the lines of Baer’s audiences, because I’m still not seeing a lot of discussion about social media strategies in the legal news (which I follow quite closely) and I’m definitely not bumping into a lot of firms actively participating on the social media playgrounds where I frequently play.

What is this B2B issue raised by Baer’s audiences?  They believe that consumers are hanging out on Facebook, not businesses and, since most large law firms have and seek businesses as clients (get it?  B2B as in “business to business”), Facebook and other social media are not for them.

If an illusion that social media doesn’t apply to B2B businesses is the reason that law firms are resisting social media, law firms might be interested in the rest of Baer’s post, which opines that social media is probably more important for B2B companies than B2C companies.  Why?  Because B2B companies have a smaller potential customer base, a higher price point and a customer decision funnel that is more influenced by word of mouth and reputation.

Baer uses the examples of companies selling $10K pieces of manufacturing equipment versus sellers of $3 cans of potato chips, but he could just as well have been describing a high end law firm.  B2B companies still need to educate their buying audience and position themselves as thought leaders in their industry, and social media with its huge impact on search engine results is the current platform of choice to advance these goals.

So listen up law firms — if you want an efficient channel for demonstrating your expertise, educating your potential clients about why you’re the superior solution to their problems, monitoring what others are saying about you, and developing loyalists who will sing your praises on the world wide web for all to see, head on over to Baer’s blog and read his post.  And while you’re there, I highly recommend checking out his post titled 7 Ways To Use Social Media To Build Stunning Brands.

photo credit:  istockphoto.com

15,740 Social Media Experts On Twitter — What’s A Lawyer To Do?

December 28, 2009

Blogger B.L. Ochman has been using Tweepsearch to follow the proliferation of social media gurus on Twitter.  She found 4,487 of them in May 2009.  Seven months later, she found almost 16,000, leading her to write Self-Proclaimed Social Media Gurus On Twitter Multiplying Like Rabbits.

Other bloggers are having fun with her numbers, including one that projected Twitter To Be Nearly Entirely Composed Of Social Media Experts By 2013.

This video also does an amusing job of portraying social media gurus as snakeoil salesmen.

Lawyers would be fools to ignore social media for growing their digital footprint and ultimately their practices, so what is a smart lawyer who needs a little guidance to do?  Turning to free sources without a sales agenda like Plugged In Lawyer is an excellent start.  😉  If you need more than do-it-yourself resources, Ochman recommends looking for the following characteristics in a social media consultant:

  • Somebody who brings solid social media experience to the table
  • Somebody who sells solutions, not formulas
  • Somebody who doesn’t promise that social media will provide a quick fix for your bottom line

Still stymied?  Email me at pluggedinlawyer @ gmail.com.  I am an avid follower of the social media space (with a special eye toward how it impacts lawyers) and I can make suggestions regarding paid consultants.

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